Four brown chickens with red crops walking around in a barn.

Register for Indemnity Before a Livestock or Poultry Disease Disaster Strikes

Keeley ParishLivestock diseases, Planning

During the 2015 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreak in the United States, over 50 million chickens died. This led to a 12 percent drop in the egg layer market, severely impacting revenue across the U.S. (Chappell, 2022). HPAI, which is often referred to as “bird flu,” struck again in February 2022 and 57 million birds (APHIS, 2023) have died …

The Caribbean Island of Hispaniola with Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Too Close for Comfort: African Swine Fever Identified in Haiti & the Dominican Republic

Keeley ParishAnimal Health, Livestock diseases, Planning

About 20 percent of Vermont dairy farms raise pigs as well as dairy cows. Ninety percent of these farms raise pigs seasonally, and their health concerns may not be a priority for farmers. However, there is growing concern about the global spread of African swine fever (ASF), a deadly foreign animal disease (FAD) of pigs that was identified in two …

A graphic showing two farmers feeding three pigs from a trough on a farm.

Use Biosecurity to Prepare and Prevent African Swine Fever in the U.S.

Dr. Julie SmithAnimal Health, Livestock diseases

African swine fever (ASF) is an incurable viral disease of pigs but does not pose a threat to human health. There are many ways that ASF can spread from one part of the world to another, or from one premises to another. The following guidelines for keeping pigs healthy are especially important for reducing the chances of spreading ASF. Do …

Swine farm

Updates on African Swine Fever

Kortnie WheatonAnimal Health, Livestock diseases, Traffic Control Leave a Comment

*Updated March, 2023. African swine fever (ASF) has the potential to destroy the U. S. pork industry by killing millions of pigs if it enters the country. A study from Iowa State University projected that if ASF spread to the United States and was not controlled within two years, the pork industry would lose $50 billion over ten years. Even …

USDA beagle inspector dog

International Travel: A Disease Risk for Livestock

Samantha ShieldsFarm Visitors, Livestock diseases Leave a Comment

During October 2019, Australia’s agriculture minister cancelled a Vietnamese woman’s visa after authorities found 22 pounds of undeclared food products in her luggage. The luggage contained pork, quail, squid, pâté, fruit, eggs and garlic (Griffiths, 2019). International travel and trade increases the risks of introducing a foreign/exotic disease or pest into another country. Australia had to develop an extensive eradication …

Poultry production and secure food supply plans

Small Farms, Big Impact: Secure Food Supply Plans

Samantha ShieldsAnimal Health, Livestock diseases, Policy Leave a Comment

Livestock production in the United States varies in size and scope from large-scale commercial operations to small-scale, backyard producers. At the national level, plans have been created to ensure that in the event of a foreign animal disease outbreak, unaffected parts of the agriculture industry can avoid interruption. These “food supply plans” may seem unimportant for farms with local markets …

Dominoes on a table

Domino Effect of the African Swine Fever Outbreak

Meg StevensAnimal Health, Livestock diseases, Risk Communication

What do you do when an uncontrolled virus is rapidly sweeping the world’s largest pork producer, killing millions of pigs? Furthermore, how do you make people who are removed from the problem care about it? China is currently trying to answer these questions as they experience an African swine fever (ASF) outbreak, a huge threat to national and international biosecurity. …